In January 2006, I had 2 options with Bailey, my large rescue Doberman, put him to sleep at the request of the local parish council, or figure out a way to save him. I had tried obedience classes, special workshops, and some one on one training but Bailey was profoundly disturbed. He was exceptionally aggressive at any moving objects but particularly dogs and bicycles and had pulled me across car bonnets on more than one occasion trying to attack a child’s wheeled buggy or bicycle. He’d also attacked other dogs and turned on me if he couldn’t get to them. A good natured dog in the house he was an evil menace outdoors.

Rob specialises in training dogs for security and personal protection. All I wanted was a dog I could walk without returning home in tears. What I’ve ended up with is a dog I walk in a crowded place, past other dogs and bicycles, comfortably in the knowledge that I can retrieve the situation if he does decide to “have a go”. In addition, I also have a dog which is now trained to police standards speak on command and passive site work, working in environments with plenty of distractions and physical threats. He’s not perfect, but he’s totally a different dog to what he was.

There are loads of dogs trained in the UK who claim to work with last resort difficult dogs, or defencive guarding breeds like “Dobes” and “Rotties”. But as an ordinary mortal and without police resources available to me, I’ve not found a single one in my search that’s achieved what rob has with my dog. Bailey is still alive – and I have a great dog – thanks to him.